Tag Archives: probiotic strains

Probiotic Strains And Specific Benefits

People were asking about the kinds & brands of probiotics I like, but I’m no doctor and what works for me specifically might not be your thing.

Below is a super helpful guide that does a bang up job breaking down probiotic strains and specific benefits.

PLEASE NOTE~ www.humnutrition.com, where I found this great info, is a vitamin companies blog site, so if you click through to their page there are some subtle links to products on bottom of  their original post . I am in no way affiliated with them, nor have I tried their products…So, I’m not saying do or don’t buy from them, but do enjoy their free info! – Rachel

PROBIOTIC GUIDE

L. Acidophilus

Best Probiotic For: Vaginal health, Diarrhea, Acne

Consumption of the bacterium L. Acidophilus has been going on since the 20s when doctors would recommend acidophilus milk for treating constipation and diarrhea.

These microbes survive stomach passage and are able to colonize in the intestine. There is good evidence looking at Acidophilus NCFM in treating vaginal infections. Other studies show that it has been demonstrated in humans to reduce problems associated with lactose intolerance and even decrease the risk of colon cancer [1].

However, it is not just digestive woes that probiotics can help address. A clinical case series followed 300 patients who took a probiotic mixture of L. acidophilus and L. Bulgaricus. They documented that 80% of acne patients had some degree of clinical improvement, particularly effective in inflammatory acne. Later, an Italian study involving 40 patients found L. Acidophilus and B. Bifidum supplementation produced better clinical outcomes in acne as well as better tolerance and compliance with antibiotics [2].

L. Rhamnosus

Best Probiotic For: GI support, Eczema

Rhamnosus is thought to be the most extensively studied in adults and children, and strong evidence shows that it colonizes the intestine. Gut flora is disrupted during travel, and healthy bacteria is killed off during a round of antibiotics. Rhamnosus GG has been found beneficial specifically for treating diarrhea associated with these cases [1].

Another exciting study found that this strain was also potentially beneficial in preventing eczema. The children of women who supplemented with it during childbirth were half as likely to develop atopic eczema by the age 4 than the children of women who did not [2].

L. Plantarum

Best Probiotic For: Inflammation

In the gastrointestinal tract L. Plantarum can help regulate immunity and control inflammation. A 2007 study found that the probiotic could suppress an inflammatory response in the gut. Perhaps most significantly, a double blind placebo-controlled study over 4 weeks concluded that L. Plantarum 299v provided effective symptom relief, especially of abdominal pain and bloating, in patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome [1].

L. Casei

Best Probiotic For: GI support, Brain function

Studies show some promising results with L. Casei for digestive support and regulating diarrhea. One study on the effect of milk fermented by L. Casei strain DN-114 found that supplementation significantly reduced the incidence of diarrhea [1].

L. Casei also made headlines when a study found it beneficial in relieving anxiety. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study found supplementation with 24 billion units of the L. Casei strain Shirota led to a rise in probiotics Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, as well as a significant decrease in symptoms of anxiety and depression [2].

Now let’s take a look at a separate class of probiotics, Bifidobacterium.

B. Lactis

Best Probiotic For: Immunity

To boost the immune system, B. Lactis is a promising choice. One study had participants taking either a probiotic or a placebo for 6 weeks. At the end of the period, researchers measured antibody levels and found greater increases in antibodies of the B. Lactis group than in placebo participants, concluding that this probiotic may help improve immune function [1]. In addition, a 2009 study found that supplementation of the strain B. Lactis DN-173 led to self-reported improvements in digestive comfort [2].

B. Longum

Best Probiotic For: Constipation, Brain Function

B. Longum is one of the first types of bacteria to colonize our bodies at birth. These important microorganisms ferment sugars into lactic acid, helping to stabilize the acidity of the GI tract and inhibit growth of harmful bacteria. For a group of adults prone to constipation, taking a mix of B. Longum BB536 with milk or yogurt for 2 weeks increased bowel movements [1].

B. Longum is also one of the species researched for the role of probiotics in the gut brain axis. A report from University College Cork found in a study of healthy men that supplementing with B. Longum 1714 caused stress levels to decrease and memory to improve [2].

B. Bifidum

Best Probiotic For: Immunity, GI support

Time, stress, diet and antibiotics can all deplete the body’s supply of B. Bifidum. Researchers found that these microbes help regulate the innate immune response, your body’s first line of defense against infection.

B. Bifidum has also been shown to prevent intestinal pathogens or digestive disrupters from flourishing in the gut, essential in restoring the bacterial balance and optimizing digestion. Clinical research found it supports a significant reduction in IBS symptoms, an improvement in quality of life and even helps relieve occurrences of ulcerative colitis – a chronic inflammatory bowel disease. [1].

B. Breve

Best Probiotic for: GI support, Anti-aging

A pilot study found that B. Breve was effective in increasing stool frequency in children with functional constipation. These researchers also found a positive effect in stool consistency and relief in abdominal pain, making B. breve a promising addition for easing digestive woes like constipation [1].

Other studies looking at the benefit of probiotics on skin ailments found a fascinating trend. B. breve B-3 could potentially be used to prevent photo-aging induced by chronic UV irradiation [2]. This ability to mitigate the detrimental effects of UV exposure in sun damage is great news for keeping skin plump, hydrated and younger-looking.

Not to be confused with streptococcal infections or the bacteria that causes strep throat, some species and strains of Streptococcus have promising research on the benefits for health and wellbeing.

Streptococcus

Streptococcus Thermophilus

Best For: GI support, Skin support

This probiotic displays antibacterial activity against harmful intestinal microbes, indicating a possibility to prevent diseases. A study on S. Thermophilus in combination with L. Casei and L. Bulgaricus found reduced incidence of Antibiotic Associated Diarrhea with supplementation.

There is also promising research on this species for supporting skin. Ceramides are natural lipids that make up the surface of the skin structure. Depleted ceramide levels are clinically linked with dry and damaged skin. S. Thermophilus was shown to have a beneficial effect on the level of ceramides in the barrier of the skin, which protects underlying tissue from infection, dehydration and chemicals. These skin-supporting microbes also act as antioxidants in the body, trapping reactive forms of oxygen that dry, damage and age the skin [1].

Source: The Guide to Choosing the Best Probiotic For You | HUM Nutrition Blog